Archives

  • Lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the Tertiary volcanic rocks on Svartenhuk Halvø and adjoining areas, West Greenland
    Vol. 50 (2022)

    The upper Cretaceous–Tertiary Nuussuaq Basin in West Greenland contains a thick succession of siliciclastic sediments and overlying volcanic rocks. The first studies in the early 19th century were centred on the coal and fossils in the sediments and minerals in the volcanic rocks. The present focus of interest includes modern stratigraphic and volcanological studies to decipher the basin evolution and support hydrocarbon and mineral exploration.

    This special issue of GEUS Bulletin presents the lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the Paleocene and Lower Eocene volcanic rocks on the Svartenhuk Halvø and adjoining areas to the north and east. The olivine-rich Vaigat Formation is more than 2000 m thick and comprises three members, of which the lowest is crustally contaminated. The basaltic Svartenhuk Formation is up to 1350 m thick and comprises four members. It extends from Svartenhuk Halvø to large areas to the north and east. The basaltic Naqerloq Formation, of early Eocene age, occurs in western Svartenhuk Halvø in erosional remnants up to 300 m thick. The comprehensive descriptions and chemical analyses are intended to serve as a guide for future studies.

    This bulletin is a companion to bulletin volumes 39 and 40 on the volcanic rocks of the Vaigat and Maligât Formations on Disko and Nuussuaq.

  • Annual Volume 2022
    Vol. 49 (2022)

  • Volume 48 cover in Danish

    Kortbladsbeskrivelse, Geologisk kort over Danmark, 1:50 000, Møn Dele af 1511 I, 1511 IV og 1512 II
    Vol. 48 (2021)

    Den geologiske kortbladsbeskrivelse af Møn omfatter foruden hovedøen Møn tillige øerne Nyord, Degneholm, Lindholm og Langø. Desuden er det sydøstligste hjørne af Sjælland, Kalvehave, og det nordøstligste hjørne af Falster, Grønsund, medtaget på kortbladet.

    Kortbladsbeskrivelsen giver den systematiske, geologiske beskrivelse af jordarterne, som forekommer på det geologiske kort. Desuden indgår beskrivelsen af geologien ned til en dybde af 60–80 m u.h.o., som er repræsenteret ved fire geologiske tværsnit baseret på boringerne i GEUS’ boreprøve-database Jupiter.

    De overfladenære geologiske forhold på Møn domineres af moræneler, som dækker ca. 70% af landområdet. Sandede aflejringer, som dækker ca. 20%, består henholdsvis af smeltevandssand og marint sand. Sidstnævnte danner halvøen Ulvshale med et udbygget krumodde-system og den marine sandflade øst for Nyord. I dalstrøgene findes Postglacialt tørv mellemlejret af ferskvandssand og -ler, hvilket især er karakteristisk for opfyldningen af den tidligere fjordarm ved Borre Sømose.

    Den mest markante geologiske dannelse på Møn er skrivekridtet på Møns Klint. Her danner en serie stejlt stående flager af skrivekridt parallelle bakkerygge i landskabet, hvor det højeste punkt er Aborre Bjerg 143 m o.h. Flager af skrivekridt findes ikke kun ved Møns Klint, men indgår mange steder i landskabets opbygning, som f.eks. langs Hvideklint på sydkysten af Møn.

    This volume is will be available in English in 2022.

  • Volume 47 cover image.

    Annual Volume 2021
    Vol. 47 (2021)

  • Volume 46 cover

    Jurassic stratigraphy of East Greenland
    Vol. 46 (2021)

     

    The Jurassic basin of East Greenland has an international reputation not only for its well-exposed examples of rift-related depositional systems but also as a source of direct analogues for the subsurface of the Norwegian shelf and the North Sea. In addition, the basin has played an important role over many years in research into Boreal Jurassic biostratigraphy and ammonite taxonomy. A well-constrained stratigraphic framework is an essential component of basin analysis, and understanding of the stratigraphy of the Jurassic in East Greenland has advanced in the last decades in parallel with intensive sedimentological, sequence stratigraphic and palaeontological research. 

    The aim of this bulletin, therefore, is to present a comprehensive, well-illustrated revision and up-date of the Jurassic stratigraphy of East Greenland to guide and constrain research efforts in future years. The Jameson Land Supergroup spans from the uppermost Triassic to the lowermost Cretaceous and comprises five groups that together include a total of 25 formations and 48 members. Many of these units are revised in this bulletin, and three new formations and 14 new members are introduced.

  • Volume 45, issue 2 cover

    Denudation history and landscape development in East Greenland: Part Two
    Vol. 45 No. 2 (2021)

     

    The geology of East Greenland north of 70°N – including the Wandel Sea Basin – exposes unique evidence of the basin development between the Devonian collapse of the Caledonian Orogen and the extrusion of volcanics during Palaeogene break-up of the North-East Atlantic. Do the unconformities in the stratigraphic record represent periods of stability and nondeposition? Or do the unconformities represent periods of subsidence and accumulation of rocks followed by episodes of uplift and erosion which removed those rocks? How do the flat-topped mountains fit into the tectonic framework of the region? And when did these elevated plateaus reach their present elevation? To answer such questions, we have used apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) and vitrinite reflectance (VR) data together with stratigraphic landscape analysis and observations from the stratigraphic record to study the denudation history and landscape development of East Greenland.

    In three separate, but interrelated papers, we present the results of these investigations. We show that episodes of kilometre-scale vertical movements (both ups and downs) have affected East Greenland and areas beyond, before as well as after the opening of the North-East Atlantic. Part two consists of a single monograph. Two shorter papers are published in part one.

  • Volume 45, issue 1 cover

    Denudation history and landscape development in East Greenland: Part One
    Vol. 45 No. 1 (2021)

     

    The geology of East Greenland north of 70°N – including the Wandel Sea Basin – exposes unique evidence of the basin development between the Devonian collapse of the Caledonian Orogen and the extrusion of volcanics during Palaeogene break-up of the North-East Atlantic. Do the unconformities in the stratigraphic record represent periods of stability and nondeposition? Or do the unconformities represent periods of subsidence and accumulation of rocks followed by episodes of uplift and erosion which removed those rocks? How do the flat-topped mountains fit into the tectonic framework of the region? And when did these elevated plateaus reach their present elevation? To answer such questions, we have used apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) and vitrinite reflectance (VR) data together with stratigraphic landscape analysis and observations from the stratigraphic record to study the denudation history and landscape development of East Greenland.

    In three separate, but interrelated papers, we present the results of these investigations. We show that episodes of kilometre-scale vertical movements (both ups and downs) have affected East Greenland and areas beyond, before as well as after the opening of the North-East Atlantic. Part one consists of two papers. A third, longer paper is published in part two.

  • Volume 42 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Petroleum geology of the Upper Jurassic – Lower Cretaceous of East and North-East Greenland: Blokelv-1 borehole, Jameson Land Basin
    Vol. 42 (2018)

    Editors: Jon R. Ineson and Jørgen A. Bojesen-Koefoed

    The exposed Jurassic succession in East and North-East Greenland has long been presented as an analogue for equivalent deeply buried strata on the Norwegian conjugate shelf and offshore North-East Greenland. In particular, the Upper Jurassic marine mudstone succession is often ascribed source-rock potential as proven from coeval rocks on the Northwest European margin. Previous outcrop investigations have not convincingly confirmed this potential, however, and three boreholes were drilled between 2008 and 2010 to provide full coverage of the Upper Jurassic – Lower Cretaceous petroleum source-rock succession in eastern Greenland. The Blokelv-1 borehole was drilled in 2008 in central Jameson Land to investigate the Middle Oxfordian – Lower Volgian Hareelv Formation, representing the lowermost part of the composite source-rock succession.

    The common aim of the collection of eight scientific papers in this bulletin, introduced by an account of the technical and logistic challenges of the drilling operation, is to document the significance of the Hareelv Formation in a petroleum geological context. Papers on the biostratigraphy, sedimentology, provenance and diagenesis establish the framework and geological history of the succession while companion papers on the source-rock potential, burial and exhumation history and igneous intrusive activity in the region contribute to an improved understanding of the petroleum geology of the Jameson Land Basin.

     

  • Volume 41 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Review of Survey activities 2017
    Vol. 41 (2018)

    Editors Adam A. Garde, Ole Bennike and W. Stuart Watt

    The 22 contributions in this issue of Review of Survey activities demonstrate the broad field of activities performed by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland and external partners.

    Seven papers on Danish geology comprise an investigation of reservoir sandstones for oil and gas production in the Danish Central Graben, an evaluation of alternative depository sites for unwanted brine in a commercial gas storage facility, and a study of alum shale nanoporosity, which provides new insight into the Danish shale gas play. Till deposits are addressed in a paper on chalk-glacitectonite and in an example of using ground-penetrating radar for a structural study. Two offshore articles describe Neogene oil-bearing diatom ooze in the North Sea and a large area of unusual, inclined bedding in Skagerrak.

    In Greenland, four papers deal with remote sensing in geological mapping, describing advanced methodology and results of photogrammetry and hyperspectral mapping from mobile platforms such as helicopters and boats, and a fifth paper discusses the need for systematic updates of Survey maps as new data are acquired. A new geophysical map offshore West Greenland is also presented and geochemical data from sedimentary rocks in North Greenland are used to discuss potential mineralisation processes related to the world-scale zinc deposit at Citronen Fjord. The ongoing monitoring of the Greenland ice sheet is addressed in four contributions, including the newly established radioactive waste study at Camp Century and a reconstruction of past sea-ice extent off eastern Greenland back to the 19th century. Besides, records of European whaling and trading in the 17th–19th centuries are used to discuss past climate variations in West Greenland.

    The issue also contains an evaluation of future use of and demand for rare-earth elements in wind turbines, a study of laser ablation techniques in the analysis of fish otoliths for fish stock monitoring, and an account of current activities to maintain and expand a common geological database for the European Union.

     

  • Volume 40 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks of the Maligât Formation and associated intrusions on Disko and Nuussuaq, Paleocene of West Greenland
    Vol. 40 (2018)

    Asger Ken Pedersen, Lotte Melchior Larsen and Gunver Krarup Pedersen

    The upper Cretaceous–Tertiary Nuussuaq Basin in West Greenland contains a many kilometres thick succession of siliciclastic sediments and overlying volcanic rocks. The first studies in the early 19th century were centred on the coal and fossils in the sediments and the minerals in the volcanic rocks, including famous occurrences of native iron. The present focus of interest includes modern stratigraphic and volcanological studies to decipher the basin evolution and support hydrocarbon and mineral exploration.

    This bulletin presents the lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the Paleocene volcanic rocks of the Maligât Formation and its related intrusions on Disko and the Nuussuaq peninsula; it concludes with a detailed discussion of the effects of crustal contamination processes. The Maligât Formation is up to 2000 m thick and comprises four formally defined members and 15 chemically defined informal units. It is mainly composed of basalt lavas but also includes basaltic andesite, andesite and dacite flows and rhyolite tuffs. The silicic rocks and intrusions were produced by contamination in high-level magma chambers and commonly contain native iron.

    The comprehensive descriptions and analyses of each member and unit represent a synthesis of many years of work and are intended to serve as a guide for future studies, including exploration for mineral deposits associated with some units of the formation.

    A companion bulletin (volume 39) on the volcanic rocks of the picritic Vaigat Formation that underlies the Maligât Formation was published in 2017.

     

  • Volume 39 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the volcanic rocks of the Vaigat Formation on Disko and Nuussuaq, Paleocene of West Greenland
    Vol. 39 (2017)

    Asger Ken Pedersen, Lotte Melchior Larsen and Gunver Krarup Pedersen

    The upper Cretaceous–Tertiary Nuussuaq Basin in West Greenland contains a many kilometres thick succession of siliciclastic sediments and overlying volcanic rocks. The first studies in the early 19th century centred on the coal and fossils in the sediments and the minerals in the volcanic rocks, including famous occurrences of native iron. The present focus of interest includes modern stratigraphic and volcanological studies to decipher the basin evolution and support hydrocarbon exploration.

    The Nuussuaq Basin is the only onshore analogue for the sedimentary and volcanic basins offshore West Greenland primarily known from seismic data. The excellently exposed volcanic rocks, in particular giant foreset-bedded hyaloclastite deposits, are of a size comparable to seismic sections and therefore directly applicable to their interpretation.

    This bulletin presents the lithostratigraphy, geology and geochemistry of the Paleocene volcanic rocks of the Vaigat Formation on Disko and the major part of the Nuussuaq peninsula. The Vaigat Formation in this area is up to 1600 m thick and composed mainly of olivine-rich picrites, with ten formally defined members and 20 informal units. The comprehensive descriptions and analyses of each member and unit represent a synthesis of many years of work and are intended to serve as a guide for future studies, including exploration for mineral deposits associated with some units of the formation.

    A companion bulletin on the volcanic rocks of the Maligât Formation overlying the Vaigat Formation was published in 2018.

     

  • Volume 38 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Review of Survey activities 2016
    Vol. 38 (2017)

    Editors Adam A. Garde and Ole Bennike

    The 17 contributions in this Review of Survey activities reflect the wide range of activities currently performed by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, commonly in collaboration with external partners.

    Topics in and around Denmark include the important Danish potential for geothermal energy, a shale gas study, securing seismic exploration data from the North Sea for the public, new information on Cretaceous–Palaeogene chalk and limestone, the importance of GEUS’ Jupiter database for the national monitoring of groundwater resources, study of nitrate runoff into streams from agricultural fields, as well as high-precision mapping of contaminated landfill sites and location of sinkholes using digital elevation maps.

    Activities in Greenland are represented by a study of potential gold mineralisation sites in South-East Greenland using advanced statistical methods, delineation of potential petroleum reservoirs in the Nuussuaq Basin using modern hand-held photogrammetry and geophysical logging, and monitoring of the Greenland ice sheet including a new study around Camp Century. A final historical paper celebrates the pioneer Danish geophysicist Inge Lehmann and discusses political issues in connection with the installation of the first seismographs in Denmark and Greenland.

     

  • Volume 37 GEUS Bulletin front cover

    Biostratigraphic correlation of the western and eastern margins of the Labrador–Baffin Seaway and implications for the regional geology
    Vol. 37 (2017)

    Henrik Nøhr-Hansen, Graham L. Williams & Robert A. Fensome

    The Labrador–Baffin Seaway between Canada and Greenland is a key element in understanding the tectonic evolution of the North Atlantic region during late Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. The sedimentary rocks forming the continental margins on either side of this seaway represent a vast data source documenting the evolution of the region from the initial continental rifting to the formation of a strait linking the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. This sedimentary archive is important both for charting the geotectonic history and assessing the resource potential of the area. The study presented in Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletins 36 and 37 is a major contribution to our understanding of the development of the Labrador–Baffin Seaway. It is based on new palynological analysis of samples from 13 offshore wells on the Canadian Margin and six wells from the Greenland Margin, and is the first comprehensive study to present an integrated, consistent and fully documented biostratigraphic correlation across both continental margins.

    This bulletin presents the palynostratigraphic framework that permits detailed correlation between the Canadian and Greenland continental margins; palynological-event charts are provided for the 19 offshore wells. The focus is on the stratigraphic evolution of the margins, particularly with respect to major unconformities that form the basis for published sequence and seismic stratigraphic schemes. The palynological data also contribute to our understanding of the significant environmental and climatic changes that occurred in the region from Early Cretaceous to late Neogene times.

     

1-15 of 51