https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/issue/feed GEUS Bulletin 2021-03-22T14:02:58-07:00 Catherine Jex cje@geus.dk Open Journal Systems <p>GEUS Bulletin (eISSN: 2597-2154) is the current flagship journal published by the <a href="https://eng.geus.dk/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS)</a>. Previously, the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin (eISSN: 1904-4666). We are peer-reviewed and diamond open access. GEUS Bulletin publishes geoscience research papers, monographs and map descriptions for Denmark, Greenland and the Arctic region. We believe that open science benefits scientists, industry and society, so we do not charge publication fees and all our articles can be freely downloaded online. IF 2019: 0.680 5-year IF: 0.656</p> <p><strong>GEUS Bulletin is open for submissions to geoscientists whose research is focussed on Denmark, Greenland and the Arctic region. Read more in our <a href="https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/about">journal scope</a>.</strong></p> https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/6526 New insights from field observations of the Younger giant dyke complex and mafic lamprophyres of the Gardar Province on Tuttutooq island, South Greenland 2021-03-08T11:13:25-08:00 Lot Koopmans lk55@st-andrews.ac.uk Robert A. Webster rw99@st-andrews.ac.uk Rory Changleng rmc25@st-andrews.ac.uk Lucy Mathieson lmm29@st-andrews.ac.uk Alasdair J. Murphy ajm46@st-andrews.ac.uk Adrian A. Finch aaf1@st-andrews.ac.uk William McCarthy wm37@st-andrews.ac.uk <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;">The Gardar Province of south Greenland is defined by the products of alkaline igneous magmatism during the Mesoproterozoic. The most laterally extensive Gardar intrusions are a series of giant dyke complexes best exposed on the Tuttutooq archipelago. We present new field observations and a geological map of north-east Tuttutooq island that provide fresh insights into the temporal evolution of the Younger giant dyke complex and two associated ultramafic lamprophyres. Our data demonstrate that distinctive crystallisation regimes occurred in different sectors of the dyke complex, leading to the formation of marginal gabbros and ovoid pod-like domains displaying lamination, modal layering and/or more evolved differentiates. We infer that at least two pulses of magma contributed to the formation of the Younger giant dyke complex. In addition, the relative ages of two ultramafic lamprophyre diatremes are constrained and attributed to two distinct phases of rifting in the Gardar Province.</span></p> 2021-06-16T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Lot Koopmans, Robert A. Webster, Rory Changleng, Lucy Mathieson, Alasdair J. Murphy, Adrian A. Finch, William McCarthy https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/6090 Estimating pesticides in public drinking water at the household level in Denmark 2021-02-23T12:32:37-08:00 Denitza D. Voutchkova dv@geus.dk Jörg Schullehner jsc@geus.dk Carina Skaarup caska@sdu.dk Kirstine Wodschow ikwo@sdu.dk Annette Kjær Ersbøll ake@sdu.dk Birgitte Hansen bgh@geus.dk <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;">Pesticide pollution has raised public concern in Denmark due to potential negative health impacts and frequent findings of new substances after a recent expansion of the groundwater monitoring programme. Danish drinking water comes entirely from groundwater. Both the raw groundwater and the treated drinking water are regularly monitored, and the chemical analyses are reported to a publicly available national database (Jupiter). Based on these data, in this study we (1) provide a status of pesticide content in drinking water supplied by public waterworks in Denmark and (2) assess the proportion of Danish households exposed to pesticides from drinking water. ‘Pesticides’ here refers also to their metabolites, degradation and reaction products. The cleaned dataset represents 3004 public waterworks distributed throughout the country and includes 39 798 samples of treated drinking water analysed for 449 pesticides (971 723 analyses total) for the period 2002–2019. Of all these chemical analyses, 0.5% (</span><em style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">n</em><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;"> = 4925) contained a quantified pesticide (&gt;0.03 μg/l). Pesticides were found at least once in the treated drinking water at 29% of all sampled public waterworks for the period 2002–2019 and at 21% of the waterworks for the recent period 2015–2019. We estimate that 56% of all Danish households were potentially exposed at least once to pesticides in drinking water at concentrations of 0.03–4.00 μg/l between 2002 and 2019. However, in 2015–2019, the proportion of the Danish households exposed to pesticides (0.03–4.00 μg/l) was 41%. The proportion of Danish households potentially exposed at least once to pesticides above the maximum allowed concentration (0.1 μg/l) according to the EU Drinking Water Directive (and the Danish drinking water standard) was 19% for 2002–2019 and 11% for 2015–2019. However, the maximum concentrations were lower than the World Health Organization’s compound-specific guidelines. Lastly, we explore data complexity and discuss the limitations imposed by data heterogeneity to facilitate future epidemiological studies.</span></p> 2021-04-12T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Denitza D. Voutchkova, Jörg Schullehner, Carina Skaarup, Kirstine Wodschow, Annette Kjær Ersbøll, Birgitte Hansen https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5552 Monitoring for seismological and geochemical groundwater effects of high-volume pumping of natural gas at the Stenlille underground gas storage facility, Denmark 2021-02-16T13:31:52-08:00 Trine Dahl-Jensen tdj@geus.dk Rasmus Jakobsen raj@geus.dk Tina Bundgaard Bech tib@geus.dk Carsten Møller Nielsen cmn@geus.dk Christian Nyrop Albers cal@geus.dk Peter H. Voss pv@geus.dk Tine B. Larsen tbl@geus.dk <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;">The large natural gas storage facility at Stenlille, Denmark, has been monitored to investigate the effect of pumping large amounts of gas into the subsurface. Here, we present a new dataset of microseismicity at Stenlille since 2018. We compare these data with methane in groundwater, which has been monitored since gas storage was established in 1989. Further, we conducted a controlled 172 day microcosm experiment of methane oxidation on an isolated microbial community under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For this experiment, water was filtered from a well at Stenlille with elevated levels of thermogenic methane and ethane. No microseismic activity was detected in the gas storage area above an estimated detection level of ML 0.0 for the established network. The long-term monitoring for methane in groundwater has still only detected one leak, in 1995, related to a technical problem during injection. The microcosm experiment revealed that oxidation of methane occurred only under aerobic conditions during the experiment, as compared to anaerobic conditions, even though the filtered water was anoxic</span></p> 2021-03-22T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Trine Dahl-Jensen, Rasmus Jakobsen, Tina Bundgaard Bech, Carsten Møller Nielsen, Christian Nyrop Albers, Peter H. Voss, Tine B. Larsen https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5369 Validation of airborne and satellite altimetry data by Arctic Truck citizen science 2021-03-10T10:45:38-08:00 Andreas Stokholm andreas_stokholm@hotmail.com Sine M. Hvidegaard smh@space.dtu.dk Rene Forsberg rf@space.dtu.dk Sebastian B. Simonsen ssim@space.dtu.dk <p>The elevation of ice sheets response dynamically to climate change and satellite altimetry is the preferred tool for evaluating the ice sheet-wide changes. <em>In-situ</em> validation are needed to ensure the quality of the observed elevation changes, but the coast is most often the limiting factor for the amount of <em>in-situ</em>&nbsp;data available. As more and more tourists are accessing the ice sheets, citizen science might provide the needed <em>in-situ</em>&nbsp;data in an environmental and cost-efficient way. Here, we investigate opportunistic kinematic-GPS profiles across the Greenland ice sheet, collected the<em> American-Icelandic Expedition on the Greenlandic icecap 2018</em>. First, the collected GPS-data are tested against widely used NASA Operation IceBridge airborne lidar-scannings, and shows good agreement, with an accuracy of 11 cm. The main difference is attributed to changes in the compaction of the snow as encountered while driving, as well as changing tire pressures. The kinematic-GPS data is then used for satellite validation by inter-comparing it with data from ESA's CryoSat-2 mission. Here, a bias in the two records of 89 cm is observed, with the Cryosat-2 observation originating from the subsurface of the ice sheet. This points to surface penetration of Ku-band radar on the Greenland ice sheet, and the observed magnitude is in accordance with the literature. Finally, we assess the long-term durability of citizen science kinematic-GPS data, when compared to a profile obtained in 2005 near Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland. Here, the records show an average ice elevation decreased of 9 meters and with peaks at 25.7 meters. This result show how kinematic-GPS data can be used to see the full impact of climate change by repeat measurements. Thereby are citizen science kinematic-GPS data shown to be a highly versatile approach to acquire high-resolution validation data for satellite altimetry, with the added benefit of potentially direct sampling properties of the surface and firn, when applying traditional airborne platforms. Thereby linking up with citizen-science expeditions is truly a beneficial way of providing cost-efficient satellite validations and may also have a societal impact by involving more in the climate monitoring of ice sheets.</p> 2021-05-28T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Andreas Stokholm, Sine M. Hvidegaard, Rene Forsberg, Sebastian B. Simonsen https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5342 Middle Jurassic sandstone deposition in the Wandel Sea Basin: evidence from cardioceratid and kosmoceratid ammonites in the Mågensfjeld Formation in Kilen, North Greenland 2020-12-22T06:37:08-08:00 Peter Alsen pal@geus.dk Jussi Hovikoski jhov@geus.dk Kristian Svennevig ksv@geus.dk <p>Age assessments from both palynostratigraphy and macrofossil biostratigraphy of the sandstone-dominated Mågensfjeld Formation, Wandel Sea Basin, North Greenland were hitherto hampered by post-burial thermal degradation of dinoflagellate cysts and a lack of well-preserved macrofossils. The formation was previously assigned to the Upper Cretaceous based on erroneous fossil identifications. Finds of cardioceratid and kosmoceratid ammonites during recent field work now provide the first age control of the unit, demonstrating it to be of late Bajocian – late Bathonian and perhaps Callovian (Middle Jurassic) age. This makes it among the oldest Jurassic units, perhaps even Mesozoic units, recorded in Kilen, North Greenland and eastern North Greenland. Previously, the complex structural and tectonic evolution of the area was poorly understood, and the structural relation of the Mågensfjeld Formation to the surrounding Mesozoic units was a puzzle. The new age assessment simplifies the structural situation in the area significantly. Further, the inference of a large reverse fault previously required to explain the proximity of the Mågensfjeld Formation to neighbouring Jurassic units is now unnecessary. The data show that the Wandel Sea Basin was influenced by the Middle Jurassic transgression and had sufficient accommodation space for marine deposition earlier than previously thought. The unit serves as a key datapoint and analogue for possible Middle Jurassic units in adjacent offshore basins.</p> 2020-12-21T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Peter Alsen, Jussi Hovikoski, Kristian Svennevig https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5302 Preliminary landslide mapping in Denmark indicates an underestimated geohazard 2020-11-09T00:20:11-08:00 Kristian Svennevig ksv@geus.dk Gregor Lützenburg gl@ign.ku.dk Marie K. Keiding mke@geus.dk Stig Asbjørn Schack Pedersen sasp@geus.dk <p>The process of coastal erosion is well known to the public and decision-makers in Denmark; however, there is little awareness of the risks posed by larger landslides. Only a few scientific studies investigate landslides in Denmark, and as a result, the country is underrepresented in international landslide inventories. Here, we present a systematically produced preliminary landslide inventory based on digital elevation models and high-resolution orthophotos. So far, the preliminary inventory documents 3026 morphological expressions of landslides close to the coast and inland, showing that landslides are more widespread in Denmark than previously recognised. A number of these landslides are near buildings and infrastructure. This paper therefore highlights the potential for geohazardous landslides to occur in Denmark on a national scale and discusses some of the implications. Two of the major questions arising from this study are (1) how to approach potential geohazards in a country with no framework or precedence for landslide hazard and risk management and (2) how landslides and associated risk in Denmark will evolve under a changing climate.</p> 2020-11-09T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5298 Thermo-tectonic development of the Wandel Sea Basin, North Greenland 2021-03-08T13:39:18-08:00 Peter Japsen pj@geus.dk Paul F. Green paul.green@geotrack.com.au James A. Chalmers jac@geus.dk <p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;">The Carboniferous–Palaeogene Wandel Sea Basin of eastern North Greenland (north of 80°N, east of 40°W) is an important piece in the puzzle of Arctic geology. It is particularly important for understanding how the Paleocene–Eocene convergence between Greenland, the Canadian Arctic and Svalbard relates to the compressional tectonics in the High Arctic, collectively known as the Eurekan Orogeny. In this study, we present apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data and review published vitrinite reflectance data combined with observations from the stratigraphic record to place firmer constraints on the timing of key tectonic events. This research study reveals a long history of episodic burial and exhumation since the collapse of the Palaeozoic fold belts in Greenland. Our results define pre-Cenozoic exhumation episodes in early Permian, Late Triassic, Late Jurassic and mid-Cretaceous times, each involving the removal of kilometre-scale sedimentary covers. Mid-Paleocene exhumation defines the timing of compression along the major fault zones during the first stage of the Eurekan Orogeny, after the onset of sea-floor spreading west of Greenland. Regional exhumation that began at the end of the Eocene led to the removal of most of a kilometre-thick cover that had accumulated during Eocene subsidence and involved a major reverse movement along the Harder Fjord Fault Zone, northern Peary Land. These events took place after the end of sea-floor spreading west of Greenland, and thus, represent post-Eurekan tectonics. Mid–late Miocene exhumation is most likely a consequence of uplift and incision across most of the Wandel Sea Basin study area. The preserved sedimentary sequences of the Wandel Sea Basin represent remnants of thicker strata that likely extended substantially beyond the present-day outline of the basin. We find that the present-day outline of the basin with scattered sedimentary outliers is primarily the result of fault inversion during Eurekan compression followed by deposition and removal of a kilometre-thick overburden.</span></p> 2021-04-26T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Peter Japsen, Paul F. Green, James A. Chalmers https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5297 Peneplains and tectonics in North-East Greenland after opening of the North-East Atlantic 2021-01-25T11:58:34-08:00 Johan M. Bonow johan.bonow@geovisiona.com Peter Japsen pj@geus.dk <p>Elevated plateaus with deeply incised valleys characterise elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) in all climate zones. These features are, however, a topic of debate regarding when and how the large-scale landscapes formed. We have investigated and mapped the partly glaciated landscape of North-East Greenland (70–78°N). The area consists of crystalline basement and Palaeozoic–Mesozoic rift basins, capped by Palaeogene basalts that erupted during the northeast Atlantic break-up. Our stratigraphic landscape analysis reveals a typical EPCM dominated by two elevated erosion surfaces, extending 200 km east–west and 900 km north–south. The low-relief Upper Planation Surface (UPS; c. 2 km above sea level) cuts across basement and Palaeogene basalts, indicating that it was graded to base level defined by the Atlantic Ocean in post-basalt times and subsequently uplifted. The UPS formed prior to the deposition of mid-Miocene lavas that rest on it, south of the study area. In the interior basement terrains, the Lower Planation Surface (LPS) forms fluvial valley benches at c. 1 km above sea level, incised below the UPS. The LPS is thus younger than the UPS, which implies that it formed post mid-Miocene. Towards the coast, the valley benches merge to form a coherent surface that defines flat-topped mountains. This shows that the LPS was graded to near sea level and was subsequently uplifted. Hence, both the UPS and the LPS formed as peneplains – erosion surfaces graded to base level. The fluvial valley benches associated with the LPS further indicates that full glacial conditions were only established after the uplift of the LPS in the early Pliocene (c. 5 Ma). The uplift of the LPS led to re-exposure of a Mesozoic etch surface. We conclude that episodes of late Neogene tectonic uplift shaped the stepped landscape and elevated topography in North-East Greenland.</p> 2021-01-21T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Johan M. Bonow, Peter Japsen https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5284 Greenland bare-ice albedo from PROMICE automatic weather station measurements and Sentinel-3 satellite observations 2021-02-17T07:41:37-08:00 Adrien Wehrlé adrien.wehrle@hotmail.fr Jason E. Box jeb@geus.dk Masashi Niwano mniwano@mri-jma.go.jp Alexandre M. Anesio ama@envs.au.dk Robert S. Fausto rsf@geus.dk <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-thickness: initial; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;">The Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet (PROMICE) provides surface meteorological and glaciological measurements from widespread on-ice automatic weather stations since mid-2007. In this study, we use 105 PROMICE ice-ablation time series to identify the timing of seasonal bare-ice onset preceded by snow cover conditions. From this collection, we find a bare-ice albedo at ice-ablation onset (here called bare-ice-onset albedo) of 0.565 ± 0.109 that has no apparent spatial dependence among 20 sites across Greenland. We then apply this snow-to-ice albedo transition value to measure the variations in daily Greenland bare-ice area in Sentinel-3 optical satellite imagery covering the extremely low and high respective melt years of 2018 and 2019. Daily Greenland bare-ice area peaked at 153 489 km² in 2019, 1.9 times larger than in 2018 (80 220 km²), equating to 9.0% (in 2019) and 4.7% (in 2018) of the ice sheet area.</span></span></p> 2021-04-19T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 2021 Adrien Wehrlé, Jason E. Box, Masashi Niwano, Alexandre M. Anesio, Robert S. Fausto https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5254 Review of Survey activities: Colophon, contents, introduction 2020-05-27T05:53:15-07:00 Flemming G. Christiansen fgc@geus.dk 2017-07-31T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 0 https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5253 Structural analysis of the Rubjerg Knude Glaciotectonic Complex, Vendsyssel, northern Denmark 2021-03-14T08:45:20-07:00 Stig A. Schack Pedersen sasp@geus.dk <p>Pedersen, S.A.S. 2005: Structural analysis of the Rubjerg Knude Glaciotectonic Complex, Vendsyssel, northern Denmark. <em>Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin 8, 192 pp</em>.</p> <p>The Rubjerg Knude Glaciotectonic Complex is a thin-skinned thrust-fault complex that was formed during the advance of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet (30 000 – 26 000 B.P.); it is well exposed in a 6 km long coastal profile bordering the North Sea in northern Denmark. The glaciotectonic thrust-fault deformation revealed by this cliff section has been subjected to detailed structural analysis based on photogrammetric measurement and construction of a balanced cross-section. Thirteen sections are differentiated, characterising the distal to proximal structural development of the complex. The deformation affected three stratigraphic units: the Middle Weichselian arctic marine Stortorn Formation, the mainly glaciolacustrine Lønstrup Klint Formation and the dominantly fluvial Rubjerg Knude Formation; these three formations are formally defined herein, together with the Skærumhede Group which includes the Stortorn and Lønstrup Klint Formations. The Rubjerg Knude Formation was deposited on a regional unconformity that caps the Lønstrup Klint Formation and separates pre-tectonic deposits below from syntectonic deposits above.</p> <p>In the distal part of the complex, the thrust-fault architecture is characterised by thin flatlying thrust sheets displaced over the footwall flat of the foreland for a distance of more than 500 m. Towards the proximal part of the complex, the dip of the thrust faults increases, and over long stretches they are over-steepened to an upright position. The lowest décollement zone is about 40 m below sea level in the proximal part of the system, and shows a systematic step-wise change to higher levels in a distal (southwards) direction. The structural elements are ramps and flats related to hanging-wall and footwall positions. Above upper ramp-hinges, hanging-wall anticlines developed; footwall synclines are typically related to growth-fault sedimentation in syntectonic piggyback basins, represented by the Rubjerg Knude Formation. Blocks and slump-sheets constituting parts of the Lønstrup Klint Formation were derived from the tips of up-thrusted thrust sheets and slumped into the basins. Mud diapirs are a prominent element in the thrust-fault complex, resulting from mud mobilisation mainly at hanging-wall flats and ramps.</p> <p>Shortening during thrust-fault deformation has been calculated as 50%. Only about 11% of the initial stratigraphic units subjected to thrust faulting has been lost due to erosion. The thrust-fault deformation was caused by gravity spreading of an advancing ice sheet. Overpressured mud-fluid played an important role in stress transmission. The average velocity of thrust-fault displacement is estimated at 2 m per year, which led to compression of a 12 km stretch of flat-lying sediments, c. 40 m in thickness, into a thrust-fault complex 6 km in length. The thrust-fault complex is truncated by a glaciotectonic unconformity, formed when the advancing ice sheet finally overrode the complex. When this ice sheet melted away, a hilland- hole pair was formed, and meltwater deposits derived from a new ice-advance (NE-Ice) filled the depression. The NE-Ice overran the complex during its advance to the main stationary line situated in the North Sea. When this ice in turn melted away (c. 19 000 – 15 000 B.P.), the glacial landscape was draped by arctic marine deposits of the Vendsyssel Formation (new formation defined herein).</p> 2005-12-15T00:00:00-08:00 Copyright (c) 0 https://geusbulletin.org/index.php/geusb/article/view/5249 Lithostratigraphy of the Palaeogene – Lower Neogene succession of the Danish North Sea 2020-05-26T05:53:34-07:00 Poul Schiøler veronica.svard@openacademia.net Jan Andsbjerg veronica.svard@openacademia.net Ole R. Clausen veronica.svard@openacademia.net Gregers Dam veronica.svard@openacademia.net Karen Dybkjær veronica.svard@openacademia.net Lars Hamberg veronica.svard@openacademia.net Claus Heilmann-Clausen veronica.svard@openacademia.net Erik P. Johannessen veronica.svard@openacademia.net Lars E. Kristensen veronica.svard@openacademia.net Iain Prince veronica.svard@openacademia.net Jan A. Rasmussen veronica.svard@openacademia.net <p>As a result of a lithological, sedimentological and biostratigraphic study of well sections from the Danish sector of the North Sea, including some recently drilled exploration wells on the Ringkøbing–Fyn High, the lithostratigraphic framework for the siliciclastic Palaeogene to Lower Neogene sediments of the Danish sector of the North Sea is revised. The sediment package from the top of the Chalk Group to the base of the Nordland Group is subdivided into seven formations containing eleven new members. The existing Våle, Lista, Sele, Fur, Balder, Horda and Lark Formations of previously published lithostratigraphic schemes are adequate for a subdivision of the Danish sector at formation level. Bor is a new sandstone member of the Våle Formation. The Lista Formation is subdivided into three new mudstone members: Vile, Ve and Bue, and three new sandstone members: Tyr, Idun and Rind. Kolga is a new sandstone member of the Sele Formation. Hefring is a new sandstone member of the Horda Formation. Freja and Dufa are two new sandstone members of the Lark Formation. Danish reference sections are established for the formations, and the descriptions of their lithology, biostratigraphy, age and palaeoenvironmental setting are updated.</p> 2007-06-29T00:00:00-07:00 Copyright (c) 0