Detection of terrain changes in southern Denmark using persistent scatterer interferometry

Authors

  • Stig A. Schack Pedersen Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. Denmark
  • Geraint Cooksley Altamira Information, Còrsega 381-387, E-08037 Barcelona, Spain
  • Marc Gaset Altamira Information, Còrsega 381-387, E-08037 Barcelona, Spain
  • Peter Roll Jakobsen Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. Denmark

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.34194/geusb.v23.4835

Abstract

Since 1991, a number of European satellites have acquired data of the Earth’s surface for environmental monitoring. In general, a satellite will orbit the Earth in about 1½ hours and it takes 35 days before an ERS or ENVISAT satellite repeats radar scanning of the same position. For younger generations of satellites, such as RADARSAT and TERRA, the scanning repeat interval has decreased to 24 and 11 days, respectively, so that hundreds of radar scenes of the same place, produced over the past c. 20 years, are now available.

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Published

2011-07-15

How to Cite

Schack Pedersen, S. A., Cooksley, G., Gaset, M. ., & Roll Jakobsen, P. (2011). Detection of terrain changes in southern Denmark using persistent scatterer interferometry. GEUS Bulletin, 23, 41–44. https://doi.org/10.34194/geusb.v23.4835

Issue

Section

RESEARCH ARTICLE | SHORT

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