Assessing urban groundwater table response to climate change and increased stormwater infiltration

Authors

  • Mark T. Randall Computational Hydraulics International, 147 Wyndham Street North, Suite 202, Guelph, Ontario, N1H 4E9 Canada
  • Lars Troldborg Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. Denmark
  • Jens Christian Refsgaard Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. Denmark
  • Jacob B. Kidmose Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. Denmark

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.34194/geusb.v28.4715

Abstract

The global climate is expected to show continued warming throughout the coming century. As a direct consequence of higher temperatures, the hydrological cycle will undergo significant changes in the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation and evapotranspiration. In addition to more frequent and severe droughts and floods, climate change can affect groundwater recharge rates and groundwater table elevation (Bates et al. 2008). Some previous studies of climate change impact on groundwater have suggested alarming reductions in ground-water recharge and lowering of water tables. Other studies, especially those focusing on regions of higher latitudes, have indicated a potential rise in water tables due to increased precipitation and recharge (Scibek & Allen 2006; Woldeamlak et al. 2007)

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Published

2013-07-10

How to Cite

Randall, M. T., Troldborg, L., Refsgaard, J. C., & Kidmose, J. B. (2013). Assessing urban groundwater table response to climate change and increased stormwater infiltration. GEUS Bulletin, 28, 33–36. https://doi.org/10.34194/geusb.v28.4715

Issue

Section

RESEARCH ARTICLE | SHORT