Developing multi-sensor drones for geological mapping and mineral exploration: setup and first results from the MULSEDRO project

  • Björn Heincke Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
  • Robert Jackisch Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Str. 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
  • Ari Saartenoja Radai Oy, Teknologiantie 18, 90590 Oulu, Finland
  • Heikki Salmirinne Geological Survey of Finland, Lähteentie 2, FI-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
  • Sönke Rapp Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Am Technologiepark 1, 45307 Essen, Germany
  • Robert Zimmermann Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Str. 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
  • Markku Pirttijärvi Radai Oy, Teknologiantie 18, 90590 Oulu, Finland
  • Erik Vest Sörensen Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
  • Richard Gloaguen Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Str. 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
  • Lisa Ek LTU Business AB, Aurorum 1, 97775 Luleå, Sweden
  • Johan Bergström LTU Business AB, Aurorum 1, 97775 Luleå, Sweden
  • Arto Karinen Radai Oy, Teknologiantie 18, 90590 Oulu, Finland
  • Sara Salehi Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
  • Yuleika Madriz Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Str. 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany
  • Maarit Middleton Geological Survey of Finland, Lähteentie 2, FI-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
Keywords: Drones, Geological Mapping, Unmanned Aerial System, Hyperspectral imaging, Magnetic survey

Abstract

The use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), also known as drones, is becoming increasingly important for geological applications. Thanks to lower operational costs and ease of use, UAS offer an alternative approach to aircraft-based and ground-based geoscientific measurements (Colomina & Molina 2014). Magnetic and hyperspectral UAS surveys hold particular promise for mineral exploration, and several groups have recently published studies of magnetic data collected by UAS for such applications (Malehmir et al. 2017; Cunningham et al. 2018), although equivalent studies using hyperspectral data are still rare (Kirsch et al. 2018). Combining both techniques is particularly useful. Magnetic measurements play an important role in mineral exploration, since magnetisation in rocks is mainly associated with magnetite and other iron minerals, which can be used in mapping and targeting of mineral deposits (Dentith & Mudge 2014). Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a powerful exploration and mapping technique in areas where the rock surface is well-exposed, and where geological units and mineral compositions can be estimated from spectral features of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visual and infrared range.

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Published
2019-07-29
How to Cite
Heincke, B., Jackisch, R., Saartenoja, A., Salmirinne, H., Rapp, S., Zimmermann, R., Pirttijärvi, M., Vest Sörensen, E., Gloaguen, R., Ek, L., Bergström, J., Karinen, A., Salehi, S., Madriz, Y., & Middleton, M. (2019). Developing multi-sensor drones for geological mapping and mineral exploration: setup and first results from the MULSEDRO project. GEUS Bulletin, 43. https://doi.org/10.34194/GEUSB-201943-03-02
Section
REVIEW ARTICLE | SHORT